Former KNUT secretary Hon.Wilson Sossion finally speaks about abolishment of boarding schools

The ODM-nominated MP, Wilson Sossion, has called for the abolishment of boarding schools to end student unrest .

 

According to the former Secretary General of the Kenya National Union of Teachers (KNUT), the boarding school system is a burden on the parents. Why are students not burning classrooms or laboratories?

 

The government should wake up and face the reality. The boarding system is costing innocent parents a lot of money,” Mr Sossion on said, adding that the school has seen unrest since 2008, and the government should not act like it has just begun. He also accused the government of ignoring the situation.

 

The MP affiliated with the UDA expressed regret that the recommendations of the Claire Amolo report were “collecting dust,” and that the time has come to put them into action.

 

 

“The boarding system should be removed and students should be allowed to be day scholars so that we can end the madness we are seeing now.”

 

They claim that the report made several recommendations that should have been implemented to end school unrest. The unrest has affected 11 schools in Bomet and Kericho counties. Tenweek High School, most recently in Bomet, was closed after a night of tension as students threatened to go on a stampede Chebunyo Boys’ High School, Koiwa Boys’, Chebunyo Boys’, and Mogor Secondary School were also affected. Huh.

 

 

Boarding schools are overburdening teachers In early September, the Kenya Union of Post Primary Education Teachers (KUPPET) urged the government to initiate a gradual phase-out of boarding schools to reduce the workload on the union . Addressing the issues, claiming that teachers in boarding schools are overburdened as they must simultaneously teach and parent their students.

 

 

According to KUPPET, the workload has increased due to the COVID-19 pandemic, where boarding school teachers have to put in more hours to ensure that students make up for the time lost during school closures. And the Lower Eastern Regions of Missouri said teachers in boarding schools are overburdened because they have to perform the dual role of teaching and parenting.

 

 

“It doesn’t seem like anyone is talking about it, but it’s going to be an issue. What’s going to happen now and what’s happened is that we have 100 percent infection. He said.

 

He said that those students who are still very young in class 7 and class 8 to stay away from their parents are adding a lot of work for the teachers, adding that the children can also take care of their families and their siblings. Remembering the comfort of

 

In July, Education CS George Magoha rejected a proposal to immediately close 4,000 boarding schools. He said that every situation related to boarding schools would be looked into on the basis of its merit. There is no plan to eliminate them, but thinking in that direction. There should be a gradual process. Maybe new start-ups (schools) will be day schools,” Magoha said.

 

Magoha said it would be impossible to finish the schools all at once, but promised to adopt a policy that would enroll new learners in day schools.

 

If the government heeded to the call of KUPPET then abolishing boarding schools would eventually lead to an increase in the number of day schools in the country.

 

Some education stakeholders regard the abolition of boarding institutions as a measure to end school unrest.

 

“There has never been a policy to abolish boarding schools. This is not a troubling issue at the moment.” CS said during a workshop for education officers in Mombasa earlier in July.

 

Competency-Based Curriculum (CBC) Task Force by Magoha proposed abolishing primary and proposed junior secondary schools (JSS) under the new 2-6-3-3-3 education system.

 

The stakeholders behind the move claimed that the proposal will reduce unnecessary expenses and make learning more affordable for parents and guardians.

 

Kuppet SG says that  boarding schools should be phased out before 2023, when there will be a double intake in junior secondary

 


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