*Important education events In 2022 Packed Calendar that every teacher and parent must know to prepare well*

This is a critical year for education stakeholders. It is jam-packed with significant events, some of which are the result of a disrupted school calendar and transition challenges.

 

Here are some key events and players involved in regaining lost academic time as well as upcoming reforms.


 

Teachers:

It is expected that teachers will be innovative, guide learners, counsel those who have been traumatized by last term’s arson cases, and ensure curriculum coverage.

 

Knut/Kuppet Unions

This year, unions will prioritize the recruitment and advancement of more teachers.

Renegotiating the 2021-2025 CBA to include a salary increase component.

 

Address the costs of Teacher Development Training (TPD), the age of participants, and the duration of training.

 

Teachers are being assigned to (Junior Secondary Schools) grades 7, 8, and 9.

 

TSC (Teachers Service Commission):

Having teachers cover the curriculum.

 

Teachers will continue to bear the brunt of the Covid-19 effects and will require full government support via the TSC.

 

Recruitment of more teachers to meet demand, as well as planning for the transition to Junior Secondary schools

 

Maintaining the teaching sector by managing the relationship with unions following the non-monetary CBA.

 

Re-examine CBA negotiations with unions and promotion management.

 

Education Ministry:

Opening of schools and colleges to all students and ensuring the smooth operation of the institutions while adhering to Covid-19 health protocols.

 

Basic and higher education institutions funding. To close deficits, schools’ capitation and university and college funding must be released on time.

 

Expansion of school and college infrastructure in preparation for transition and class decongestion. Preparing for a smooth transition to Junior Secondary schools.

 

Mopping up students to join schools as part of the 100% transition. Following the March national exams, the government will be required to ensure a smooth transition into the following year.

 

Tracing pregnant girls and those who have given birth in order for them to return to school, rescuing those in forced marriages, and boys enslaved in menial jobs are also priorities.

 

Pushing for curriculum recovery after students set fire to dormitories and disrupted classes.

 

Ensure the delivery of five national examinations: two KCPE and KCSE examinations, as well as one for Grade Six students.

Parents and students:

By avoiding last-term chaos, parents can ensure that their children return to school and maintain discipline.

 

Parents are expected to pay fees due at the start of the semester. Concerns about children’s safety loom as uncertainty lingers over fears of indiscipline spillover from the previous term.

 

Candidates are preparing for their March exams. Calendar of extracurricular activities condensed.

 

Transfers are a nightmare for errant students who have been kicked out of schools for participating in arson.

 

KICD (Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development):

The implementation of CBC in Grade 6 will begin in April.

 

The distribution of Grade 6 books and set books will begin the following week.

 

The evaluation of Grade 7 textbooks begins in March.

 

Validation and approval of curriculum designs for Grades 7, 8, and 9.

 

Secondary school teachers are being inducted in collaboration with TSC.

 

Monitoring and evaluating Grade 5 enrollment.

 

Kenya National Examination Council (KNEC):

The Kenya National Examination Council (KNEC) is an examination body in Kenya.

 

Under special term dates, KCPE and KCSE examinations are administered, marked, and released.

 

The CBC administers end-of-primary-education examinations in Grade Six.

 

Managing cartel attempts to sabotage examinations through irregularities.

 

TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training):

3,000 TVET trainers will be hired.

 

CBET will be implemented in all TVET institutions.

 

Infrastructure expansion to accommodate two KCSE candidates.

 

TVET needs to be rebranded in order to gain more acceptance from candidates and parents.

 

Institutional and trainer accreditation

Incorporating prior knowledge recognition into TVET will also be a major focus.

 

Improving TVET institutions as production units and expanding TVET training with the private sector will also be critical.

 

Improving TVET institutions as production units and expanding TVET training with the private sector will also be critical.

Universities:

This year will also be dominated by university funding, as the majority of them are in debt.

 

Public universities are drowning in debts of up to Sh40 billion, which has hampered their smooth operations and quest to provide quality education.

 

In addition, the universities require approximately Sh52.8 billion to complete all ongoing projects, including those that have been stalled.

 

Universities will continue to push for a fee increase from Sh16,000 to Sh48,000 in order to close their financial gaps.

 

The contentious debate has already sparked protests from students who have vowed to oppose the move.

 

The placement of KUCCPS students at private universities will also be a focus as public universities decline.

 

As stated in the Universities Act, KUCCPS places students in both public and private universities.

 

Infrastructure is being expanded in preparation for the anticipated transition.

 


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